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Book Review: Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive by jigordon
November 11, 2008, 9:32 pm
Filed under: review

In most business-related books, the general rule of thumb is that if you manage to get a single nugget of valuable information, the book was worth the cost.  This rule is a result of understanding that business books are based on amalgamations of information – that a book on any given topic isn’t going to be universally applicable and that information contained therein will only work given a set of defined criteria.

When you look at the best business books, they become “best” simply by being more applicable.  The broader the application, the broader the audience, the better the book.  Which means that Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive must be best book ever written.

OK, I don’t mean to be so overly-effusive.  But in the span of my life, I’ve done more reading than most.  I’ve read long novels and short stories.  I’ve read fiction and non-fiction (you saw my comparison to Stephen King the other day, right?  I’m a huge fan and collect old first editions of his, like My Pretty Pony, in case you were curious about what to get me for the holidays).  I’ve read boring books, interesting books and everything in between.  In fact, some would say that I read too much.  What can I say?  I love to read.  My point is that with all this reading, I’ve come to live by the general rule of thumb stated earlier.

So it came as quite a surprise that each and every one of the 50 “ways” described in this book is immediately usable in many different facets of your life.  This isn’t just a book for lawyers, negotiators, salespeople or others who have to “be” persuasive for work.  This is a book for every man, woman and child to learn how to better present their desires to another human.  Do you have a spouse, boss, co-worker, parent, child, brother, sister, friend, or email buddy?  Then, as they say, “this book is for you.”

Go get this book.  It’s better than mine.  Definitely more generally applicable (though I think the Five Fundamental Skills explained in more detail in the SLH are still pretty universal).

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