NET(net), Inc.


FOSS licenses upheld! by jigordon
February 23, 2010, 9:32 am
Filed under: contract types, copyright, current events, law, open source, source code

After a five-year struggle in US Federal District Court, Robert Jacobson recently prevailed in his copyright infringement claim against Matthew Katzer as a result of Katzer’s alleged misappropriation of open source code from Jacobson’s Java Model Railroad Interface project.

You can read all of the story in more detail at ConsortiumInfo.org.  The end result is a huge win for open source developers as a result of three key findings by the District Court:

  1. Violation of an open source software license constitutes copyright infringement, not just breach of contract (this was first upheld by the Federal Appeals Court in 2008 in this case).
  2. Use of open source code without attribution is a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.
  3. These violations entitle the Plaintiff (Jacobson) to monetary damages – which, as they’re based on violations of copyright law, are potentially much more substantial than those which may have been limited by contract law.

There are some mitigating circumstances in that the results in this case are not yet dispositive of all future violations, as the ruling of a US District Court is limited to absolute applicability only in its geographic district.  The concern is that a Federal Appellate Court (including the US Supreme Court) could overrule or otherwise reverse this decision.  Worse yet would be another US District Court coming to a different conclusion with a similar set of facts.

But for now, FOSS developers can rest a little easier knowing that their creations are protected by copyright law.

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This Week on The Web 2009-10-11 by jigordon

These are the discussions that happened around the web this week – maybe you already read about them, maybe you need to again.  Come join the party on twitter (follow me here and you’ll participate in the conversation live.)

I also realized that many of you might have no idea what you’re seeing below.  Sorry.  These are “tweets”, 140 maximum character messages sent via Twitter.  Within the Twitterverse individual users follow others and have followers (think of it like overlapping Venn diagram circles).  To read a tweet, you have to wade through a bit of jargon used to make the most of the 140 character limitation.  “RT” for example, is shorthand for “Re-tweet” and the @____ is the username of some other individual on Twitter.  Combined together, then, “RT @_____” means that someone else wrote a tweet that I found important and I now want to forward along to my followers.  The URL’s are then also shortened by shortening services like bit.ly to make the most of the character limitation, too.  Lastly, you might see “hash” identifiers “#______” which are ways to tag tweets of a particular flavor for easy searching later and “<” which means that I am commenting on what came before it.



This Week on the Web 2009-08-02 by jigordon
August 2, 2009, 9:32 am
Filed under: contract management, contract terms, contract types, negotiation, TWoTW